Aloha Mustangs!

Herriman’s First Polynesian class seeks to embrace and share island culture

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Aloha Mustangs!

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Pacific Islanders make up only one percent of students at Herriman High School. Despite the small number that makes up their representation through the hallways, Polynesian students gather each Bday to learn more about and embrace the culture that makes them proud to be apart of. 

“The people of the pacific class is a place where not only Polynesian people can attend,” said P.O.P club president, Lucy Tahi. “It’s a class where everyone may come and share about each of their cultures and how many of their families migrated from the islands.” 

The class is based around embracing Polynesian culture while learning more about the various islands, family genealogy, and ancestry while working hard to become the best versions of themselves, not only as individuals but for their current and future families. 

“P.O.P helps me learn about my culture and embrace it, which is important to me as a minority here at Herriman High,” said senior student-athlete, Kepu Fifita.  

Although the Pacific Islander community of Herriman High is a small demographic within the student body, the P.O.P Club consists of students from all around the world. Students and their families originate from islands such as Tonga, Samoa, Hawai’i and New Zealand. 

In this class, we are also taught how to become proactive and strengthen our leadership for our families, school and community. Whether it is through community service projects, strengthening relationships with our families, or even sharing our culture with our fellow Mustangs, this class helps us become who we seek to be in the future as people. 

College and career readiness is an important focus of the course. Students learn more about higher education, job and scholarship opportunities. The group focuses on improving academics/attendance, visits college campuses, attends conferences and explores their options to prepare for life after high school. 

“Being able to learn about different scholarship opportunities really helps me become aware of ways to afford school and make it a reality, especially for [opportunities] that are available to Polynesian students like me,” said P.O.P member, Make Fifita.  

If you wish to join P.O.P next year, make sure to pre-register for the class this upcoming spring, or feel free to visit Mrs. Neiufi’s room (2503) for more information about how to become involved.